ICWAR Seminar Series

21 May
2021
The variability of water storage and fluxes over large tropical river basins from multi-satellite observations and their impacts on the land-ocean continuum
The variability of water storage and fluxes over large tropical river basins from multi-satellite observations and their impacts on the land-ocean continuum

Name of the Speaker: Dr.Fabrice Papa

Title of the Seminar: The variability of water storage and fluxes over large tropical river basins from multi-satellite observations and their impacts on the land-ocean continuum

Date and Time: 21 May 2021 (Friday), 5:00pm

Online Platform: MS Teams [link to  the video of the seminar]

About the Speaker: Dr Fabrice Papa is a research Director at the Institut de Recherche pour le Développement (IRD-LEGOS, France) and has focused his research on satellite remote sensing of the Earth and its application to study the global water cycle. His main interests are the use of multi-satellite observations to understand continental hydrology and its interactions with the ocean, climate variability and global changes, particularly in tropical regions. He is a member of the Science Team (ST) of the NASA-CNES satellite Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) and co-leads the SWOT Working Group on River Science. After receiving his PhD from the University of Toulouse, France in 2003, he was employed at the NASA-GISS laboratory at Columbia University, NY, USA until 2010, when he joined IRD. From 2012 to 2017, he was on deputation at the IRD-IISc Joint International Laboratory in Bangalore, India. He is currently on IRD deputation at the University of Brasilia in Brazil.

https://publons.com/researcher/1742104/fabrice-papa/publications/

Abstract: Terrestrial waters, despite being less than 1 % of the total amount of water on Earth’s ice-free land are essential for life and human environment. They play a primary role in the global water and carbon cycles, with significant impacts on climate variability. A better characterization of their  distribution and dynamic over the whole globe is therefore of highest priority, including for the management of water resources. However, despite their importance, basic questions are still opened such as: what are the spatio-temporal variations of the fluxes and storages of continental freshwater across scales and how do they interact with climate and the anthropogenic pressure? Those questions are specifically important for the Tropics which are now facing growing demands for freshwater availability. Firstly, using multi-satellite observation techniques, we will quantify the global variations of monthly surface water extent (at 25km spatial resolution) over ~25 years (1992-2015) and assess their recent changes both in terms of climate variability and anthropogenic pressure. For large river such as the Amazon, the Ganges-Brahmaputra (G-B) or the Congo, we further combined our surface water extent estimates with hundreds of radar altimeter-derived water level time-series and DEM data to derive the spatio-temporal variability of surface freshwater storage (SWS). Over the Amazon for instance, we show that the annual amplitude of SWS variations is of ~1200km3 and contributes to ~50% of the Gravity Recovery And Climate Experiment (GRACE)-derived total water storage variations (TWS). During the 2005 exceptional drought, we estimate that the SWS deficit over the entire Amazon basin in October was about 70% as compared to other years. While over G-B we found similar contributions  of mean annual variation in SWS to TWS as for the Amazon, over the Congo this contribution is smaller, around 20%. Over the Amazon, the SSW variations are then used to decompose the GRACE-derived TWS and to isolate the variations groundwater storage and show that it contribute to ~30% of GRACE-derived (TWS).

Additionally, using radar altimetry observations, we quantify for these large rivers their long term discharge, providing an unprecedented sources of information on the dynamic of the fresh water fluxes to the ocean. We will illustrate the impacts of G-B and Irrawaddy rivers on the Bay of Bengal ocean dynamic.

Finally, we will discuss the future of hydrology from space with the launch in 2022 of the Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT, NASA-CNES) satellite, which in synergy with the current deployment of the COPERNICUS Sentinel program, will offer an unprecedented view of continental freshwater dynamics on Earth

Finally, we will discuss the future of hydrology from space with the launch in 2022 of the Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT, NASA-CNES) satellite, which in synergy with the current deployment of the COPERNICUS Sentinel program, will offer an unprecedented view of continental freshwater dynamic on Earth.

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26 Apr
2021
Beyond Science Communication at Science Gallery Bengaluru
Beyond Science Communication at Science Gallery Bengaluru

Name of the Speaker: Dr. Jahnavi Phalkey

Title of the Seminar: Beyond Science Communication at Science Gallery Bengaluru

Date and Time: 26 April 2021 (Monday), 5:00pm

Online Platform: MS Teams [link to  the video of the seminar]

About the Speaker: Jahnavi Phalkey was appointed Founding Director of Science Gallery Bengaluru in November 2018.  Previously Jahnavi held a tenured faculty position at King’s College London. She started her academic career at the University of Heidelberg, following which she was based at Georgia Tech-Lorraine, France, and Imperial College London. Jahnavi was Fellow, Wissenschaftskolleg zu Berlin (the Institute of Advanced Study, Berlin). She was also external curator to the Science Museum London, and has been a Scholar-in-Residence at the Deutsches Museum, Munich.

Jahnavi is the author of Atomic State: Big Science in Twentieth Century India and has co-edited Science of Giants: China and India in the Twentieth Century. She is the producer-director of the documentary film Cyclotron.

Jahnavi read civics and politics at the University of Bombay and the School of Oriental and African Studies, London. She holds a doctoral degree in history of science and technology from the Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta.

Abstract: Seen to be at the vanguard of the STEM to STEAM movement, the Science Gallery network is the world’s first university-linked network dedicated to public engagement with science and art with galleries in Atlanta, Dublin, London, Melbourne, Rotterdam, Venice, and Detroit.

Science Gallery Bengaluru is the first such gallery of the network in Asia with the mandate to deliver a global mission drawing on the intellectual capital of three of India’s leading research institutions, Indian Institute of Science, National Centre for Biological Science and Srishti Institute of Art, Design and Technology.

In this talk, I will introduce the form and structure of the new institution, and explore with us the ideas that inform the shape of Science Gallery Bengaluru through her journey to answer to one question: what does it mean to go beyond science communication towards an engagement with science?

Science Gallery Bengaluru is working with an idea we call “living exhibitions” that expand conversations around research through atypical juxtapositions to draw in the public at large. SUBMERGE was our first foray into this format, where we actively brought together exhibits and connected programming around the theme of water and its intersection with human life. https://bengaluru.sciencegallery.com/submerge-programmes

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24 Mar
2021
Skilful sub-seasonal meteorological forecasting for efficient hydrological modelling
Skilful sub-seasonal meteorological forecasting for efficient hydrological modelling

Name of the Speaker: Dr. Atul Kumar Sahai

Title of the Seminar: Skilful sub-seasonal meteorological forecasting for efficient hydrological modelling

Date and Time: 24 March 2021 (Wednesday), 4:00pm

Online Platform: MS Teams [link to  the video of the seminar]

About the Speaker: Dr. Atul Kumar Sahai has obtained his Masters and Ph D degree in Mathematics from the University of Allahabad. He is Scientist G and the Project Director of Monsoon Mission at Indian Institute of Tropical Meteorology (IITM) Pune, and is leading the group of Extended Range Prediction. Dr. Sahai has expertise in climate variability and prediction, climate modeling, tropical convection, monsoon dynamics, extreme weather, MJO, role of remote teleconnections from ENSO and IOD, climate change and regional climate scenario generation for impact assessment studies based on regional climate models, operational climate services, flood/drought, cyclones and extreme precipitation prediction, heat and cold wave prediction, high-performance computing, and utilization of Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning in the field of climate science.

His most notable research led to the development of a dynamical ensemble prediction system for predicting the intra-seasonal oscillations of the Indian summer monsoon season. Due to the remarkable skill of this system, it has been awarded the ISO 9001:2008 standard certification in the year 2016 and it has been operationalised in India Meteorological Department. Since then, it is being used for real time forecasting of the onset, active/break spells and withdrawal phases of the Indian summer monsoon, heavy rainfall events, cold waves, heatwaves, Monsoon Intraseasonal Oscillations, Madden-Julian Oscillation, cyclogenesis, and fluctuations in summer/winter monsoon. Dr. Sahai has also formulated several strategies for the application of these extended range forecasts in agriculture, hydrology, health, and disaster management. He was given additional charge as Head, Climate
Research and Services, India Meteorological Department (IMD) Pune for two years (2017 2018). During this tenure, he integrated and lead IMD Pune operations as per the Global Framework for Climate Services (GFCS) formulated by World Meteorological Organization (WMO) and established Regional Climate Centre. Dr Sahai is also a Member of Scientific Steering Committee of World Weather Research Programme (2019-2022) of WMO.

Abstract: Dynamical extended range prediction provides an outlook of meteorological parameters up to 2-3 weeks in advance. The extended range prediction group at IITM has developed an
ensemble prediction system based on the Climate Forecast System version 2 (CFSv2) model adopted from NCEP, USA. This prediction system proves to be very useful in predicting the intraseasonal fluctuations such as onset, active/break spells and withdrawal within the Indian summer monsoon and also the extreme weather events such as heat/cold waves, cyclones and heavy rainfall events. This system is also skilful in predicting the extremes in monthly rainfall. The India Meteorological Department is generating weekly agricultural, hydrological and health bulletins based on these extended range outlooks.

Such predictions in rainfall and other surface meteorological variables can also be used as an input to hydrological models to predict impending floods and inundations along river basins. Long lead-time predictions provide sufficient time for the decision-making process for the stakeholders. River basin rainfall forecast over the Indian region during the monsoon season in the extended range thus has several useful applications in the hydrometeorological forecast domain.

In this talk it will be discussed that how the extended-range forecast is generated and how it can be used for efficient hydrological modelling to improve the flood forecast, dam management etc.

 

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25 Feb
2021
Review and Analysis of Food-Energy-Water Nexus Studies: Conceptual models
Review and Analysis of Food-Energy-Water Nexus Studies: Conceptual models

Name of the Speaker: Dr. Aavudai Anandhi

Title of the Seminar: Review and Analysis of Food-Energy-Water Nexus Studies: Conceptual models

Date and Time: 25 February 2021 (Thursday), 6:00pm

Online Platform: MS Teams [link to  the video of the seminar]

About the Speaker: Aavudai Anandhi, Ph.D., is an Assistant Professor, Biological Systems Engineering, College of Agriculture and Food Science, Florida A&M University. She obtained her Ph.D from IISc, civil engineering department in 2008. In Dr. Anandhi’s group, during research, teaching, and outreach, they often use this concept: “There are known knowns, known unknowns, and unknown unknowns”. This aids in the application of computational intelligence for modeling ecosystem processes and their interactions at the food-water-energy (FEW) nexus while improving these predictions to environmental changes (climate, water-use and land-use) using complex systems engineering. They continue to develop novel solutions to engineering design and decision methodology for synergizing FEW systems for efficient, productive, and sustainable ecosystem management. For this they use a mixture of systems thinking approaches, conceptual and structural models, artificial intelligence, spatial statistics, and machine learning for analysis of the ecosystem services by exploiting new data streams to advance the system adaptation, resilience, and stress mitigation. Dr. Anandhi has authored 55+ research and teaching articles and obtained ~$12 Million funding. Her awards and recognitions include: “Emerging Researcher Award” at Florida A&M University; “Teacher of the year” award from Florida section of ASABE, ASCE’s ExCEEd fellow and “Blue Ribbon award” for innovative educational materials from ASABE. Dr. Anandhi’s work experiences and collaborations with software industry, state, federal and non-governmental agencies, as well in academic institutions in India, NY, KS and FL has provided the skills, experiences and knowledge to develop a successful program.

Abstract: This talk presents a review and analysis of the current state of research and practice in the Food- Energy-Water (FEW) nexus. It is intended to provide scientists and practitioners in the FEW domains the tools, data, knowledge, and successful applications in this research and practice area. The talk also describes knowledge gaps in the FEW nexus domains. The objectives of this talk are (a) to synthesize existing knowledge in defining and conceptualizing FEW nexus for the stakeholders and help guide them in defining and conceptualizing their own FEW nexus, (b) to identify limitations and knowledge gaps. The following questions assisted in addressing the objectives: Which systems are involved? Where is the nexus applied or intended to be applied and at what scale? How are the nexus elements assessed? and Who should be considered? The study provides narrow and broad definitions as well as simple and complex conceptualization frameworks of FEW nexus that stakeholders can use while being aware of the limitations and knowledge gaps.

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28 Jan
2021
Towards Robust Hydrologic Modeling and Design: Utility and Validity of Quantitative Precipitation Estimates
Towards Robust Hydrologic Modeling and Design: Utility and Validity of Quantitative Precipitation Estimates

Name of the Speaker: Prof. Ramesh Teegavarapu

Title of the Seminar: Towards Robust Hydrologic Modeling and Design: Utility and Validity of Quantitative Precipitation Estimates

Date and Time: 28 January 2021 (Thursday), 6:00pm

Online Platform: MS Teams [link to  the video of the seminar]

About the Speaker: Ramesh Teegavarapu, Ph.D. (Dr. T.) is a professor and graduate program director in the civil, environmental, and geomatics engineering department, at Florida Atlantic University, USA. He is also director of Hydrosystems Research Laboratory (HRL) in the department. He Is a Fulbright Scholar and Specialist and recipient of two research scholar and three excellence and innovation in teaching awards at FAU, a finalist for Distinguished teacher of the year award at FAU, and several national and international awards. He serves on the editorial board of multiple international peer-reviewed journals. His current research interests are climate variability and change, hydrometeorology, spatial precipitation analysis, hydroanalytics, water, and environmental systems modeling. Dr. T. has published over 125 technical articles in high-impact journals and conference proceedings and authored over 30 book chapters and is an author, co-editor, sole-editor of seven books from multiple reputed international publishers. He serves on multiple national and international technical committees related to water and climate change and held visiting professor appointments in Italy and Japan. Dr. T. has presented over 130 research talks including several invited and session keynote lectures in eighteen countries. He has organized, chaired, convened, and moderated over 80 technical sessions at national and international conferences and served on advisory committees of conferences and as general and technical co-chair of two international conferences. Dr. T. has designed and developed several innovative simulation and modeling environments/tools for understanding hydrological processes, hydrometeorological observations, climate change, and variability.

Abstract: Accurate measurements of precipitation that characterize its spatial and temporal variability in a region are quintessential for the success of hydrologic modeling and design. Point measurements (i.e., rain gage observations) often plagued with systematic and random errors while lacking spatial coverage are questionable inputs to hydrologic design procedures and inadequate for distributed hydrologic modeling applications. Multi-sensor source-based quantitative precipitation estimates (QPEs) developed as gridded datasets/products are increasingly being used by hydrological modeling and design communities. This talk will focus on QPEs developed using weather-surveillance radar (WSR) using rain gage information as ground truth and will address issues related to the generation of radar-based precipitation estimates, Improvements in QPEs, bias analysis, and correction methods. The utility and validity of these QPEs for hydrologic modeling, design, and hydrosystems disaster management will be discussed.

 

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22 Dec
2020
Citizen science and participatory monitoring of water resources
Citizen science and participatory monitoring of water resources

Name of the Speaker: Prof. Wouter Buytaert

Title of the Seminar: Citizen science and participatory monitoring of water resources

Date and Time: 22nd December 2020 (Tuesday), 4:00 PM

Online Platform: MS Teams [link to  the video of the seminar]

About the Speaker: Wouter Buytaert is a Professor in Hydrology and Water Resources at Imperial College London (UK). His main research interests sit at the interface between hydrological process understanding, water resources management, and sustainable development. He has two decades of research experience in the Andes, where he co-founded a regional initiative for the participatory monitoring of Andean ecosystems, which is active in Bolivia, Peru, Ecuador, and Colombia. He also works extensively in India, Nepal, and Africa, leading projects on climate change impacts, floods resilience, surface and subsurface monitoring, and the link between hydrological extremes and human health. Wouter obtained a PhD in Environmental Engineering at the University of Leuven, Belgium in 2004 and joined Imperial in 2009 after holding research positions at Lancaster University and the University of Bristol.

Abstract: All over the world, water resources systems face unprecedented challenges from overexploitation, degradation, and changing climatic boundary conditions. This poses a major challenge to their sustainable management, which is often aggravated by a scarcity of scientific evidence to support decision making. Despite the advent of remotely sensed data sources such as satellite imagery, quantifying the nature and scale of hydrological processes still relies strongly on in situ observations, which are often time and labour intensive. For example, many of the worlds rivers and other water bodies are still poorly gauged, while hydrometric monitoring networks are in decline in many places. This makes it opportune to explore new arrangements to support and improve hydrological data collection and evidence generation. One such arrangement is citizen science, which refers to the participation of the general public in the scientific discovery process. Although citizen science in itself is not a new phenomenon, the advent of new technologies for hydrological sensing, data processing, and communication opens new perspectives for its application in a water resources context. Moreover, citizen science may provide an opportunity to make the evidence creation process more collaborative, transparent and inclusive. However, implementing sustainable citizen science projects faces many challenges, ranging from the deployment of adequate and robust technologies, to ensuring the generation of long lasting benefits for all the involved actors. Here I draw upon experiences from South America, Africa, and South Asia to discuss some of the challenges and potential solutions of implementing citizen science and other types of participatory monitoring in a water resources context. I synthesise these findings by outlining an analytic framework that may help in the design and implementation of citizen science for natural resources management.

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19 Nov
2020
Water sanitation in the times of Covid-19 pandemic
Water sanitation in the times of Covid-19 pandemic

Name of the Speaker: Dr. Utpal Tatu

Title of the Seminar: Water sanitation in the times of Covid-19 pandemic

Date and Time: 19th November 2020 (Thursday), 4:30 PM

Online Platform: MS Teams

About the Speaker: Dr. Utpal Tatu is a professor at the Indian Institute of Science He obtained his his PhD from Department of Biochemistry at Indian Institute of Science and pursued his postdoctoral research at Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut where he went on to become an Assistant professor His most notable research delves into neglected and emerging infectious diseases with a focus to develop better treatments and diagnostic solutions.

His research interests include interface between human, animal and environment with One health concept On going research on amoebiasis, Bebesiosis Candidiasis, Cryptococcosis,
Giardiasis, Rabies, Trichomonosis and Trypanosomisis Most noably he has developed diagnostic solutions for antemortem diagnosis of Rabies, point of care diagnosis for Trypanosomosis and most recently for Covid 19 which is endorsed by ICMR He has received numerous accolades Birla science prize, Bioscience career development award from DBT and Ranbaxy Research Award to name a few He is an elected fellow of the Indian Academy of Sciences He was formerly the Presidents of both the Proteomics Society of India and Vice President of the Indian Society for Mass Spectrometry He is also an editorial board member of the Parasitology Journal published by the Cambridge Press.

Prof. Tatu is keen on applying his expertise in Mass Spectrometry as well as infectious diseases to address global health problems due to contaminated water.

 

Abstract: Water safety and quality are fundamental problems in underdeveloped and developing countries like India Approximately half of our country’s population practice open defecation and thrive in poor sanitary condition A significant number of communicable diseases in India are due to unsafe water and the lack of hygiene practices Contaminated water results in various gastrointestinal complications, diarrhea being the most common Diarrhea is the third leading cause of childhood mortality in India and is responsible for 13 of all deaths annually in children under 5 years of age.

My lab at IISc has been studying neglected and emerging infectious diseases, including various gastrointestinal pathogens. We take into account interactions between humans, animals and their environment to understand the emergence and spread of infectious diseases Our aim is to improve global health by minimizing risks of infection by ensuring clean food, feed, air and water. We have the expertise to address issues of water safety standards and technology to identify undesirable chemical as well as microbiological components in natural water resources. To minimize the burden of deaths caused due to consumption of impure water, a solution would be to develop early and accurate detection and removal of gastrointestinal pathogens such as Giardia, Entamoeba, Cryptosporidium, Salmonella, Shigella, Campylobacter, Shigella toxin producing Escherichia coli and Rotavirus We also monitor the quality standards of natural water resources ground water, rivers, lakes and oceans. By using most sensitive and specific molecular methods such as mass spectrometry we ensure detection of ppb level contaminants in water.

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28 Oct
2020
Hydrology and Water Resources Management in India – from Ancient to Recent Times
Hydrology and Water Resources Management in India – from Ancient to Recent Times

Name of the Speaker: Dr. Sharad Kumar Jain

Title of the Seminar: Hydrology and Water Resources Management in India – from Ancient to Recent Times

Date and Time: 28th October 2020 (Wednesday), 4:00 PM

Online platform: MS Teams [link to  the video of the seminar]

About the speaker: Dr Sharad Jain is currently serving as a Visiting Professor, Civil Engineering Department, IIT Roorkee, India. He has about 38 years R&D experience in the fields of surface water hydrology, water resources systems, environmental flows, and impacts of climate change on water resources. He was the Director, National Institute of Hydrology, Roorkee, India, during 2017-20. Dr Jain was a Post-Doctoral fellow in Japan for one year, Visiting Professor at Louisiana State University, USA, for one year, and NEEPCO Chair Professor at IIT Roorkee (2009-2012). He was also the Director General of National Water Development Agency for a short-term. Dr Jain has co-authored five books, has written 35 book-chapters, about 250 technical papers, and more than 75 technical reports. Dr Jain is a member of Editorial Boards of three reputed technical journals. He was the Chairman of the Expert Appraisal Committee (River Valley and Hydroelectric Projects), MoEF&CC. He is/was member of many scientific committees.

Abstract: Water is closely linked with human existence and survival. Relationship between humans and water is unique. Most ancient civilizations, including the Harappan (Indus Valley) civilization, developed and grew in the vicinity of springs, lakes, rivers and oceans. In the struggle for development, the need to carefully manage water propelled the growth of hydrologic science in ancient India. However, most of the knowledge of hydrologic sciences developed by our forefathers remained hidden and unknown to the world at large until the recent times.  Based on ancient literature and evidences revealed by the recent explorations, this talk will provide some fascinating glimpses into the hydrological, hydraulic and related knowledge that was developed in ancient India. The talk will also cover the water management activities in different times and describe how the management decisions evolved in different periods in response to the type and magnitude of demands for water, preferences/choices of the society, and available technology at those times.

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29 Sep
2020
Water Science - Interface with Policy and Governance
Water Science – Interface with Policy and Governance

Name of the Speaker: Dr. P. Somasekhar Rao

Title of the Seminar: Water Science – Interface with Policy and Governance

Date and Time: 29th September 2020 (Tuesday), 4:00 PM

Online platform: MS Teams [link to  the video of the seminar]

About the speaker: Dr. P. Somasekhar Rao is a Doctoral degree holder (Ph.D) in Earth Sciences and has 30 years of working experience in land and water sector having worked with The United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization, Directorate General of International Cooperation, Government of The Netherlands, Asian Development Bank, Government of India and NGOs. Currently working at Government of Karnataka for the past 5 years as Director (Technical) in Water Resources Department. He had partnered with International institutes, National and State Government Departments, Academic Universities, NGOs and Donor Agencies with focus on water and agriculture. Dr. P.S. Rao also has a Masters degree in Business Administration (MBA) from Bharatiya Vidya Bhawan, New Delhi. Dr. Rao worked in China, Uzbekistan, Malaysia, Thailand and Bhutan and travelled widely around the world representing India’s case in a number of international for a such as World Water Forums and a number of Inter-governmental conferences and facilitated participation of farmers in various international meetings and exchange visits with other country farmers. Dr. Rao introduced Modernization of Irrigation Management concepts and methodology in India and enabled setting-up the Advanced Centre for Integrated Water Resources Management (ACIWRM) in Karnataka State and designing an IWRM program in Karnataka to move towards River Basin Management. Dr. Rao was key in developing a new draft State Water Policy for Karnataka and setting up Karnataka Water Resources Information System. Dr. Rao pioneered the concept of Participatory Groundwater Management and developed Farmer Water Schools for groundwater management drawing from the experiences of Farmer Field Schools in Asia. Dr. Rao also supported evolving the Farmer Climate Schools engaging farmers with climate variability issues. Dr. Rao has several scientific and popular articles, technical reports to his credit and majorly brought out two important books on India’s Water Resources and Integrated Water Resources Management (IWRM).

Abstract: Science influences society through its knowledge and world view. Scientific knowledge influence the way many individuals in society think about themselves, others, and the environment. Societal challenges often inspire questions for scientific research, and social priorities often influence research priorities through the availability of funding for research. Water is emerging the most essential focus to the future development and economic growth of any region / society. There has been a steady increase in the demand for water use from different sectors such as domestic users – urban and rural, economic sectors – agriculture & allied sectors, services and industry apart from environmental flow requirements. This needs a paradigm shift in planning investments and management of water resources. For effective and sustainable water resources management, several policies have been made in the past – both nationally and at state level, and some are being made and various departments or agencies in the government are assigned with the responsibility of implementing these policies. Some laws are also enacted to implement the policy. The whole gamut of these actions is the governance of water resources. Government of Karnataka committed to create an enabling environment towards achieving water and food security adopting the IWRM principles and approach and had setup a new entity ACIWRM which acts as a think tank to the state Water Resources Department, engaging in policy analysis, research, planning, capacity building and develop the knowledge base to gear up the department to its future vision. How was the water science knowledge harvested for evolving new water policy and what partnerships between government and scientific institutions are playing the major role in bringing in a paradigm shift in perspectives of water resources management.

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31 Aug
2020
Can new technologies help achieve water security?
Can new technologies help achieve water security?

Name of the Speaker: Dr. Bhanu Neupane

Title of the Seminar: Can new technologies help achieve water security?

Date and Time: 31st August 2020 (Monday), 4:00 PM

Online platform: MS Teams [link to  the video of the seminar]

About the speaker: Bhanu Neupane is trained in Hydrosystems, Water Resources Management and Knowledge Management. He has a PhD in water resources management from Canada and a second Doctorate degree in Business Administration from the International School of Management, France/USA. He started his career as a change agent for a GTZ-funded agricultural inputs project in Eastern Nepal in 1987. He also served as an Agriculture and Natural Resource Management Specialist for a governmental research organisation in Nepal. He joined UNESCO (United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organisation) as a Programme Specialist in 2000 and served with the UN system-wide World Water Assessment Programme (WWAP). He was made responsible for the implementation of the International Hydrological Programme in South and Central Asia between 2005-2011. Currently he is working for UNESCO as a Programme Manager for ICT and Sciences and Open Access to Scientific Research. He is also working in the area of Open Data, essentially to improve and increase access to scientific data and information. He is also a visiting professor and regularly teaches courses related to knowledge Management, Multi-criteria Decision-Making, Water Resources management, and Disaster Risk Reduction at Universities.

Abstract: Technological solutions are transforming water resources management at an unprecedented pace. Management and governance of water resources are being influenced by a simple utilization of low cost intervention – such as a sensors — to the application of Artificial Intelligence (AI) and big data analytics. Such influences are, inter alia, helping to make reliable estimation of freshwater supplies, fostering access to high quality water, improving irrigation efficiencies for food production, and making industrial processes for energy production more sustainable. Technological innovations are also improving assimilation of vast amounts of data and information generated using a variety of platforms, unthinkable a few years ago. The technology aided information integration is contributing to better operation & maintenance, improving quality and management of water resources, thereby fostering their sustainable use and lasting resilience. But what is the global state of play for these issues? Are we inclusive and open in the process? What are the bigger questions? Is the science of hydrology and the data science or AI coevolving? What can be done to bring harmony between the two streams of sciences?

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30 Jul
2020
Hydrological Outlooks: what can we do and what could we do?
Hydrological Outlooks: what can we do and what could we do?

Name of the Speaker: Dr. Alan Jenkins

Title of the Seminar: Hydrological Outlooks: what can we do and what could we do?

Date and Time: 30th July 2020 (Thursday), 4:00 PM

Online platform: MS Teams [link to  the video of the seminar]

 

About the speaker: Alan Jenkins is Director of Science at the UK Centre for Ecology Hydrology (UKCEH), the leading UK centre for environmental science across water, land and air. With a background in hydrology, he has worked nationally and internationally on acid rain, water quality, water resources and climate change impacts He currently acts as the UK Hydrological Advisor with the World Meteorological Organisation and Chairs the UK input to the UNESCO Inter Governmental Hydrology Programme. He is leader of the WMO Task Team responsible for the development of the Hydrological Status and Outlook System (HydroSOS). He is also an Honorary Professor in the Lancaster Environment Centre at the University of Lancaster and a Visiting Professor in the Department of Geography, University College London.

Abstract: Water related challenges, such as a secure water supply, floods, droughts, and ensuring ecosystem protection and conservation, are growing concerns. Water is consistently identified as one of the highest global risks in terms of impact. These challenges already affect tens of millions of people with estimated costs in the order of magnitude of billions of US dollars and are expected to intensify with future climate change, population growth and increasing economic activities. One of the significant challenges facing societies trying to effectively manage their water resources is a lack of hydrological information products that are targeted to serve the needs of different sectors. This information deficiency is often driven by three key factors: 1) insufficient available of local scale data, 2) a lack of regional to global coherence in hydrological information and modelling systems, and 3) limited dialogue between stakeholders and the multitude of actors which renders the understanding of stakeholders needs regarding the management of water resources unclear. Because of these shortfalls, water managers and stakeholders cannot properly assess the availability of water resources on different spatio-temporal scales nor can they foresee how this availability might change over the near future, thus rendering water management and planning difficult, if not impossible. This talk will focus on current techniques and capabilities for producing sub seasonal to seasonal hydrological outlooks. It will consider what advances are needed to improve the reliability and skill in these outlooks. Lastly, it will consider the difficulties in translating the outlook into actionable messages for stakeholders.

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21 Feb
2020
Recent Advances in Himalayan Glaciology
Recent Advances in Himalayan Glaciology

Name of the Speaker: Dr Anil Kulkarni

Title of the Seminar: Recent Advances in Himalayan Glaciology [Gallery]

Date and Time: 21st February 2020 (Friday), 4:00 PM

Venue: Lecture Hall, ICWaR

 

About the speaker: Dr Kulkarni is currently working as a Distinguished Scientist at Divecha Centre for Climate Change, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore. He is instrumental in developing numerous remote sensing-based methods and models to understand Himalayan Cryosphere. These are widely used to map seasonal snow cover, glacier cover and moraine-dammed lakes. Further, these also are used to estimate glacier mass balance, stream runoff and to understand the influence of climate change on the Himalayan cryosphere. During his initial investigations, Dr. Kulkarni developed a methodology to map Himalayan glaciers using remote sensing data. This methodology was used to prepare glacier inventory of Indian Himalaya, providing information about the distribution of Himalayan glaciers, not available previously to the scientific community.  Dr Kulkarni and his team have recently developed a model based on velocity, slope and flow law to estimate the distribution of ice-thickness. This is being used to estimate glacier stored water and mass loss for Himalayan glaciers.  In addition, he is working on modelling Glacier Lake Outburst Floods in Himalaya. He also organises two weeks of training programs on Glaciology. Due to his significant contribution in the field of glaciology, he received numerous awards such as National Geosciences award, Polar science and cryosphere and team leader award from ISRO.

Abstract: Himalayan mountain range is one of the major Water Tower of Asia and stores a large concentration of snow and glaciers.  Water Towers generate more runoff due to high orographic precipitation and delay release due to storage as snow and Ice. Therefore, water is supplied during the hot and dry season, making many rivers like Indus, Ganga and Brahmaputra perennial.  Indus River considered more vulnerable under future climate change scenarios due to large contribution from snow/glacier melt, large population, high water stress and geopolitical conditions.  In addition, the livelihood of large Himalayan mountain communities also depends on the availability of water from snow and glacier melt. Therefore, periodic assessment of the state of the Himalayan cryosphere is important. In this lecture, I will give a current understanding of Himalayan cryosphere and future challenges. Recently numerous new techniques and models have been developed to estimate glacier volume, mass loss, potential glacier lake sites, assessment of flash flood from Glacier Lake Outburst Flood and effect of climate change of glacier distribution. I will discuss the significance of these contributions and its impact of water security and livelihood on mountain communities.

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28 Jan
2020
Critical Zone Science for Water Resource Management in Agricultural Landscapes
Critical Zone Science for Water Resource Management in Agricultural Landscapes

Name of the Speaker: Dr. Laurent Ruiz

Title of the Seminar: Critical Zone Science for Water Resource Management in Agricultural Landscapes [Gallery]

Date and Time: 28th January 2020 (Tuesday), 4:00 PM

Venue: Lecture Hall, ICWaR

 

About the speaker: Laurent Ruiz research interest is to understand and model the interactions between climate, anthropogenic forcings, especially agriculture, and water resources at the landscape scale. He explores how pluridisciplinary approaches, spanning Hydrology, Agronomy, Geochemistry and Social Sciences can help conceiving better management of water and nutrient cycles in agro-ecosystems. His work relies primarily on long term observations carried out within Critical Zone Observatories in France (AgrHys https://www6.inrae.fr/ore_agrhys) and in India (BVET https://mtropics.obs-mip.fr/). He holds his PhD from Montpellier University (France) and is a researcher at INRA and IRD. He has been associated with the Indo-French Cell for Water Sciences at IISc Bangalore since 2002. He is the PI of the ATCHA project (http://www6.inrae.fr/atcha/) focused on the adaptation of Indian agriculture to climate change.

Abstract: In the time of Anthropocene, global changes are questioning the capacity of the planet Earth to sustain the development of human societies in the long term. In the past two decades, this concern has fostered world wise efforts to develop integrated studies of the “Critical Zone” (CZ), the thin layer of the Earth surface, from the top of the canopy to the bottom of the aquifer, hosting the continental biosphere and providing basic human needs such as water, food, energy and ecosystem services. Critical Zone Observatories (CZO) have been set up in various climatic, geologic and human contexts with a wide range of variables being monitored on the long term. Their main challenge is to ensure the actual integration of the multiple scientific disciplines at stake, from geosciences and biological sciences to social sciences, working within a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. Using experiences from France and India, this seminar will illustrate how such integration can produce the knowledge required for effectively addressing environmental issues in agricultural landscapes.

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20 Dec
2019
The tyranny of small decisions- living with sub-optimality in the water and waster water sector: experience from the field
The tyranny of small decisions- living with sub-optimality in the water and waster water sector: experience from the field

Name of the Speaker: S. Vishwanath

Title of the Seminar: The tyranny of small decisions- living with sub-optimality in the water and waster water sector: experience from the field [Gallery]

Date and Time: 20th December 2019 (Friday), 4:00 PM

Venue: Lecture Hall, ICWaR

About the speaker: S Vishwanath is a Civil Engineer and an Urban Planner. He has 33 years of experience in the water, waste-water and sanitation sector helping design rainwater harvesting, aquifer recharge, wastewater recycling and ecosan systems. He is an Adjunct Professor and teaches a course on the theme – Water at the Azim Premji University, Bengaluru, India (http://azimpremjiuniversity.edu.in/SitePages/vishwanath-s.aspx). He is a Trustee with the Biome Environmental Trust (www.biometrust.org). One of the current projects is to help the traditional well-digging community build a million recharge wells for Bengaluru. He used to write a weekly column called Waterwise for the last 12 years for  The Hindu (http://www.thehindu.com/profile/author/s.-vishwanath/). He has been part of the expert committee which helped formulate the Rainwater harvesting policy and law for Bengaluru, the Waste-water policy for Karnataka and the Water Policy for Karnataka being drafted by the Karnataka Knowledge Commission.

Abstract: The management of water and wastewater is often seen as an institutional issue. Yet in the case of India there are many stakeholders at play apart from institutions and in fact, may crucially be using and in control of more waters and wastewaters than the government. In the quest for sustainable management of resources, optimality is put forward as a goal, whereas a series of sub optimality’s, often in conflict with the optimal, is likely the way forward. How is rainwater harvesting to work in non-optimal worlds? How is groundwater to be used and recharged? What happens to faecal sludge from pit toilets and septic tanks and wastewater in a city ecosystem? Can livelihoods also be included as part of the management of water as a resource? Do policies and standards need a fresh look in this context? Why are we subject to the tyranny of small decisions ?

Some examples and experiences from Bengaluru were discussed in the talk.

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18 Nov
2019
Mega-trends in the Growth of Hydrologic Understanding: From Newton to Darwin to Wegener
Mega-trends in the Growth of Hydrologic Understanding: From Newton to Darwin to Wegener

Name of the Speaker: Prof. Murugesu Sivalapalan 

Title of the Seminar: Mega-trends in the Growth of Hydrologic Understanding: From Newton to Darwin to Wegener  [Gallery]

Date and Time: 18th November 2019 (Monday), 4:00 PM

Venue: Lecture Hall, ICWaR

About the speaker: Murugesu Sivapalan holds a B.Sc Civil Engineering (University of Ceylon), M.Eng in Water Resources Engineering (AIT, Thailand), and obtained his 1986 Ph.D from Princeton University. He was Professor of Environmental Engineering at the University of Western Australia for 17 years, before joining University of Illinois in 2005. Siva has published on a wide range of topics, including effects of heterogeneity and scale, flood frequency, eco-hydrology and water balance and water quality modeling. He was Executive Editor of the Hydrology and Earth System Sciences journal, and was founding chair of the International Association of Hydrological Sciences’ Decade on Predictions in Ungauged Basins initiative. He is also co-founder of the new subfield of socio-hydrology. Sivapalan has received several awards for his research contributions, including the John Dalton and Alfred Wegener Medals of the European Geosciences Union, the Robert Horton Medal of the American Geophysical Union and the International Hydrology Prize of the International Association of Hydrological Sciences. Sivapalan was awarded the Prince Sultan Bin Abdulaziz International Prize for Water (Creativity Prize) in recognition of his role in developing and leading the new field of socio-hydrology. He is a Fellow of the Australian Academy of Technology and Engineering and recipient of the Centenary Medal of the Australian Government for service to hydrology and Environmental Engineering. He is currently visiting ICWaR as Satish Dhawan Visiting Chair Professor.

Abstract: Hydrologic science has undergone transformative changes over the past 100 years, from early empirical approaches to rigorous approaches based on the fluid mechanics of water movement on and below the land surface. Challenged by limitations of traditional Newtonian approaches, and embracing a Darwinian, co-evolutionary Earth system science perspective, the pursuit of hydrologic science is now guided by altogether new questions and methodologies, with a particular focus on interactions and feedbacks between parts of the Earth system that co-evolve, giving rise to the adoption of comparative hydrology. In the emergent Anthropocene, this co-evolutionary view has expanded to involve feedbacks with human-social processes as well. Hydrologic science is now entering a globalization era with a focus on new phenomena that emerge from regional and global teleconnections of the expansion of the human footprint, calling for the adoption of novel Wegenerian approaches to understand the Earth system and the role of water in it. In this lecture, I will present key milestones in the transformation of hydrologic science from Engineering Hydrology to Earth System Science.

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16 Oct
2019
Understanding hydrologic cycling from a thermodynamic Earth system perspective
Understanding hydrologic cycling from a thermodynamic Earth system perspective

Name of the Speaker: Dr. Axel Kleidon

Title of the Seminar:  Understanding hydrologic cycling from a thermodynamic Earth system perspective   [Gallery]

Date and Time: 16th October, 2019 (Monday), 4:00 PM

Venue: Lecture Hall, ICWaR

About the speaker: Axel Kleidon studied physics and meteorology at the University of Hamburg, Germany and Purdue University, Indiana, USA. He received his Ph.D. in 1998 in meteorology from the University of Hamburg. After his PostDoc at Stanford University he joined the faculty of the University of Maryland in 2001. Since 2006, he leads an independent research group at the Max-Planck-Institute for Biogeochemistry in Jena, Germany.  He regularly teaches courses on renewable energy and thermodynamics of the Earth system.His research interests fall into the highly interdisciplinary field of Earth system science and include topics such as the thermodynamics of Earth system processes, land-atmosphere interactions, the influence of vegetation, climate change, the Gaia hypothesis, and natural limits of renewable energies. He is the author of more than 100 scientific papers, co-founder and co-chief editor of the interdisciplinary science journal Earth System Dynamics of the European Geoscience Union (EGU), and has co-edited several books. He is the author of “Thermodynamic Foundations of the Earth System”, published by Cambridge University Press, and is currently completing a book project “Energy – A Very Short Introduction”, which will be published by Oxford University Press within the next year.

Abstract: The hydrologic cycle is an integral part of the whole Earth system, converting substantial amounts of energy. These conversions follow the laws of thermodynamics, which set the directions and impose fundamental limits, yet these also result in interactions and feedbacks that emphasise the need for an Earth system perspective.  In this talk, I provide the background for this thermodynamic description of the hydrologic cycle and use examples to show how thermodynamic limits in combination with a formulation of the dominant interactions can be used to describe the emergent behaviour.  I show how this approach can be used to provide simple, yet physically-based estimates of evaporation and how hydrologic cycling responds to global climate change.  I close with an outlook on potential future applications, highlighting the generality of the approach as energy, its conversions into other forms, and interactions are  at the very core of literally every Earth system process

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30 Sep
2019
Karnataka GIS : A tool towards transparent governance
Karnataka GIS : A tool towards transparent governance

Name of the Speaker: Dr. JayKumar PD (KSRSAC)

Title of the Seminar:  Karnataka GIS : A tool towards transparent governance   [Gallery]

Date and Time: 30th September, 2019 (Monday), 4:00 PM

Venue: Lecture Hall, ICWaR

About the speaker: Dr. Jayakumar P D is a team lead for capacity building division at Karnataka State Remote Sensing Applications Centre, Department of Personnel and Administrative Reforms (e-Governance), Government of Karnataka. He has PhD on Remote Sensing and GIS from Dept. of Applied Geology, Kuvempu University. His research areas include Optical Remote Sensing and GIS applications for natural sector. He has more than 10 years of experience in private, government and research & development sector in geospatial technology.

Abstract: Karnataka Geographic Information System (K-GIS) is a flagship program of the state which is visualized as a geospatial technology platform that ensures availability of updated “GIS ready data” of specified standard.  It is a novel initiative by the Karnataka State Remote Sensing Applications Centre (KSRSAC) to map and integrate all department asset data and make it available for both government and public through a single gateway i.e., K-GIS Portal (https://kgis.ksrsac.in/kgis/). The datasets are organized and standardized such that they are readily available, easily-usable “integrated” GIS content for the entire state.  The major activities of K-GIS are mapping and geo-tagging of departmental and public assets, integration of MIS data and developing GIS based Decision Support System to address the spatial challenges of Government of Karnataka (GoK) departments.  Till date more than 18 lakhs asset related information was collected and organized in 350 spatial layers and the activity is growing.  By using these spatial data around 40-45 GIS based mobile applications (Ex: Moulya, Dishaank, Chunavana, Data Collector etc.,) and around 50-55 GIS based web applications (Ex: Agriculture Dept, Family Welfare Dept, Education Dept etc.,) were developed and rolled out for department and citizen usage. It has also tailored the departmental applications with GIS content for taking decisions, tracking project implementation, monitoring progress and policy definition.  Due to its implementation by GoK, all the government institute/infrastructure data and MIS information is available to the citizens, thus facilitating the Right to Information in a user-friendly manner. The maps are also available as a service to IT enthusiast and researcher to carryout research and development activities.

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28 Aug
2019
Artificial Recharge – An all-weather solution for Groundwater Crisis or Overrated Panacea?
Artificial Recharge – An all-weather solution for Groundwater Crisis or Overrated Panacea?

Name of the Speaker: Dr. Dipankar Saha

Title of the Seminar:  Artificial Recharge – An all-weather solution for Groundwater Crisis or Overrated Panacea?  [Gallery]

Date and Time: 28th August, 2019 (Wednesday), 4:00 PM

Venue: Lecture Hall, ICWaR

About the speaker: Dr. Dipankar Saha is a former Member (Head Quarters) Central Ground Water Board, former Member Secretary, Central Ground Water Authority and Head of National Ground Water Training and Research Institute, Raipur He spearheaded the National Aquifer Mapping and Management Programme, as National Coordinator. He obtained PhD on Ground Water Management from IIT- Dhanbad and has authored more than 50 papers in International Peer Reviewed Journals and delivered more than 300 lectures and key note address in national and International Seminars. He is professionally trained from Asian Institute of Technology, Bangkok and from JICA, Tokyo. He represented the country and presented papers in World Bank session at Kathmandu, International Atomic Energy Agency at Ho-Chi Minh City, and Vienna, World Water Week – Stockholm, India-UK Water Security Exchange- Wallingford, Oxfordshire, IAH Congress in Dajeon, Korea. He led the Govt of India Delegation to Myanmar.  He remained member of many high level National Committees and has Edited/Co-edited books/Journals, the recent one is Water Governance- Challenges and Porospects published by Springer in 2019. He is the first recipient of National Geoscience Award in 2010 from CGWB as well as first recipient of Excellence in Ground Water conferred by International Association of Hydrogeologist-India Chapter in 2014.

Abstract: Groundwater is the lifeline of drinking, irrigation and industrial water supply in India. With an extraction of ~ 250 km3 annually, India are the largest user of Groundwater in the world. Though a plethora of government documents and policy papers highlighting planned and coordinated extraction management of groundwater resources is available, in practice, it has been hardly followed. So is the case of artificial recharge, often referred as medicine of all groundwater woos but mostly being executed in a segmented and unplanned manner often divested with scientific understanding of the area. Groundwater extraction has never been planned in conjunction with its annual recharge. The reason is the lack of structured approach by the Government. We use more than 85% of our extracted groundwater for irrigation through ~ 22 million wells owned by farmers. In absence of any regulatory mechanism, coupled with sops offered by the State Govts, mainly in the form of energy subsidy, has initiated a reckless extraction, creating havoc. The latest estimates reveal that about 20% of the assessment units are either overexploited or are alarmingly close to it. Artificial recharge and rain water harvesting is considered as a panacea for groundwater depletion. The Centre and State Government Departments spend huge public money mainly through various schemes like MNGREGS. The recharge structures are hardly dovetailed with local aquifer understanding, thus lacking in two basic arenas, location and design, and resulting in sub-optimal benefits. The other important issue is the lack of source water, which is primarily monsoon runoff in India. In arid and semi-arid areas, dearth of source water is a major challenge. Inter-basin water transfer should also considered for recharging the depleted aquifer. Moreover, because of climate change, the monsoon pattern is changing. The traditional understanding of types of structures and their designs needs to be revisited to accommodate and withstand high intensity rainfall.There are areas where acute groundwater mining has rendered such a condition that even if all possible recharge measures are successfully implemented and working, the resource would continue to deplete. Such a situation warrants strict direct or indirect regulation of extraction. The NAQUIM outputs are enhancing our knowledge and understanding of the prolific as well as depleted aquifer systems. The time has come to think of mega recharge schemes in hydrogeologically suitable areas.

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16 Jul
2019
Frontiers of Hydrology Research – Role of Isotope Tracer Application
Frontiers of Hydrology Research – Role of Isotope Tracer Application

Name of the Speaker: Dr. R D Deshpande

Title of the Seminar: Frontiers of Hydrology Research – Role of Isotope Tracer Applications [Gallery]

Date and Time: 16th July, 2019 (Tuesday), 4:00 PM

Venue: Lecture Hall, ICWaR

About the speaker: Dr. R D Deshpande is currently the Chairman of Geosciences Division of Physical Research Laboratory (PRL), Ahmedabad, which is a unit of Department of Space Govt. of India. He has a Ph.D. from the M.S. University of Baroda, Vadodara, based on his isotope hydrology research at PRL. Dr. Deshpande’s research is focused on understanding the complex hydro-geological and hydro-meteorological processes using stable and radioactive isotopes as a tracer tool. His research in the field of Isotope Hydrology is well-known in India and abroad. He carried out a Regional Aquifer System analyses in the North Gujarat Cambay region to explain the temperature and helium anomalies in the groundwater vis-à-vis tectonic frame work of the region. He has explained the origin and distribution of high levels of fluoride in ground waters of North Gujarat and suggested remedial measures against the endemic fluorosis. He has assigned radio-carbon and Helium accumulation ages to ground waters of Gujarat and shown that groundwater being exploited today in the water stressed areas was recharged several tens of thousands of years old. This highlighted the need for artificial recharge and rain water harvesting. He observed for the first time the kinetic isotope fractionation during liquid condensation under supersaturated condition. He has identified the zones of groundwater helium anomalies along the Narmada lineament as a signature of active hydrothermal circulation. Dr. Deshpande is the Principal Coordinator of the National Programme on Isotope Fingerprinting of Waters of India (IWIN) which is a multi-institutional collaborative research programme, aimed at isotopically characterizing various hydrological cycle components (sea surface water, atmospheric water vapor, rain water, groundwater and river water) to understand subtle aspects of interaction and exchange between them. Dr. Deshpande set up a state-of-the-art Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometer (IRMS) laboratory under the IWIN programme, dedicated for oxygen and hydrogen isotopic analyses of water and vapor samples. His research is based on numerous wide-spread and exhaustive field sampling across the country for collection of samples and their isotopic analyses. He has published more than 40 peer reviewed research papers based on this fieldwork. Dr. Deshpande is nominated as a Mission Expert in Isotope Hydrology by International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), Vienna. He has served as a member of the several Expert and Advisory committees of MOWR, MOES and the DST. He is an expert member in the Board of Studies in Geology at M.S. University of Baroda and Research Development Committee of the M.G. Science Institute, Ahmedabad and Kachchh University, Bhuj. He is a Fellow of the Geological Society of India and the Gujarat Science Academy.

Abstract: The contemporary hydrology is faced with great challenges of known problems and the greater of unknowns. Problems of water scarcity, anthropogenic pollution, geogenic contamination, dwindling surface flows, inequitable distribution and salinity ingression have turned cliché in hydrology community. The scientific processes underlying these hydrological problems are quite well understood and can be mitigated by appropriate field measures, treatment technologies, improved water use efficiency and policy interventions enforced with strong political will. While we grapple with these known water resource problems, there lies beyond a mind-boggling ignorance about certain aspects of functioning of hydrological systems, their natural course and response to perturbing stimuli. This ignorance about certain hydrological processes does not hinder the ongoing efforts of mitigating existing problems; therefore, it is presently on the back-burner. However, for a fundamental hydrology researcher, this ignorance defines the frontier of research. Filling these hydrological knowledge gaps will become essential in the coming decades to face the imminent scenario. This knowledge gap may seem only academic in nature at present but is bound to have societal implications. Some of the important questions in the above backdrop are: (1) What is the relative contribution of Western Disturbances and Indian Summer Monsoon in Himalayan precipitation, rivers and cryosphere? (2)  How are wetlands in Northeast India participating in monsoon rainfall? (3) How to identify signatures of static groundwater being circulated into the surface and atmospheric components of hydrology? (4) How much of submarine groundwater discharge can be tapped without damaging marine ecology? (5) Are there deep sources of self-recharging and self-replenishing groundwater (seawater distillate or otherwise) other than static water? (6) What is the contribution of recycled moisture in Indian precipitation? (7) How to perceive the effect of varying Himalayan riverine influx in the Bay of Bengal? (8) Can the Bay of Bengal surface water cool below threshold temperature for feeding moisture? These and many more questions define the frontier of basic research in hydrology which can be defined only by multitude of tools and expertise in conjunction with each other. Isotope application is one such tool which can play an important role in this basic research pursuit. Progress hitherto and the possibilities will be discussed in the seminar.

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26 Jun
2019
India’s Water Crisis: Bridging the Science-Policy-Practice Gap
India’s Water Crisis: Bridging the Science-Policy-Practice Gap

Name of the Speaker: Dr. Veena Srinivasan

Title of the Seminar: India’s Water Crisis: Bridging the Science-Policy-Practice Gap  [Gallery]

Date and Time: 26th June, 2019 (Wednesday), 4:00 PM

Venue: Lecture Hall, ICWaR

About the speaker: Dr. Veena’s research interests include inter-sectoral water allocation and conflict transformation, impacts of multiple stressors on water security, ground and surface water linkages, low-cost sensing and citizen science, and sustainable water management policy and practice. More recently, she has initiated work on Bangalore’s lakes with the goal of understanding how lakes can contribute to water security as well as creating a citizen’s dashboard, which synthesizes data from low-cost sensors and citizen scientists to help manage urban lakes better. Dr. Veena is in the leadership team of the Panta-Rhei initiative of the International Association of Hydrologic Sciences (IAHS). She was recently appointed to the Strategic Advisory Group of the task force for Monitoring SDG6 by UN-Water. Dr. Veena has served as a resource person for National Water Mission, and serves on the Steering Committee of the Water Conflicts Forum in India. Dr. Veena has won several awards for her research including the 2015 Jim Dooge Award for best paper in the Journal of Hydrology and Earth System Science from the European Geophysical Union, the 2012 Water Resources Research Editor’s Choice Award from the American Geophysical Union. She has received an Editor’s citation for excellence in reviewing for the Journal of Water Resources Research in the years 2016 and 2017. She is the current chair holder of the prestigious Prins Claus Chair in Netherlands from 2018-2020. She has also been invited to be an IUGG Union Lecturer in 2019. She has been a recipient of the Teresa Heinz Environmental Scholars Award, a Presidential Graduate Fellowship at Boston University as well as the government of India’s National Talent Search Scholarship. Veena received her PhD from Stanford University’s Emmet Interdisciplinary Program in Environment and Resources (E-IPER). Dr. Veena holds a Masters in Energy and Environmental Studies from Boston University, Massachusetts and a B-Tech in Engineering Physics from the Indian Institute of Technology, Bombay.

Abstract: India is one of the most water-stressed countries in the world. However, despite an appreciable increase in funding for water research, high-quality science, that is usable by stakeholders remains elusive.There is an urgent need for “use-inspired” research on questions that actually matter to stakeholders, trans-disciplinary research, and empirical primary data on fundamental science questions. But what does such research entail? What do we understand, what questions still remain to be answered? Finally, how does science actually translate into policy and practice? What are the policy levers or game changers and how do we ensure that scientific research actually informs efforts to adopt them.

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